See All Topics

Home / Section: Comic strips

News Briefs for January 6, 2009

» Magazine cartoonist Mark Anderson has relaunched his site with new features.

» Jason Killingsworth writes in Paste Magazine the five reasons he still loves Calvin and Hobbes.

» Lynn Johnston creates five cartoon thank you cards for med students to give to their patience whom they practice on.

» Tom Richmond writes how to work for MAD magazine.

» Comics Riff blogger Mike Cavna interviews Brewster Rockit’s Tim Rickard.

» South African cartoonist Jonathan Shapiro (Zapiro) may have ruffled feathers with the African National Congress lately, but he’s very much appreciated by Nelson Mandela.

» Paul Fell is launching The Daily Felltoon – a subscription service for his local Nebraska editorial cartoons. Subscribers will receive a daily email alert with a link to his latest cartoon.

» With the gloom and doom of the newspaper industry, professional webcomicker Howard Taylor did a presentation this last fall on how to turn a webcomic into a full-time gig. I think it’s worth your time. (H/T: Comixtalk)

Community Comments

#1 J Read
January/7/2009
@ 10:48 am

WHAT?! No mention of Mike Peters being sued for insulting Colombian Coffee Bean growers?

#2 Alan Gardner
January/7/2009
@ 11:43 am

WHAT?! You didn’t see the story on the home page? :)

#3 J Read
January/7/2009
@ 12:48 pm

Sorry, Alan. I sent that note right after reading the News Briefs (which were in my e-mailbox, so I hadn’t gone through your home page).

#4 Stacy Curtis
January/7/2009
@ 2:32 pm

I bet the med students’ patients have more patience once they receive a card with a Lynn Johnston cartoon on it.

#5 Rich Diesslin
January/8/2009
@ 1:32 am

The Howard Taylor presentation is interesting. Thanks for the news.

#6 Howard Tayler
January/8/2009
@ 1:40 am

Well, THAT explains the rash of email I’ve gotten recently. I was wondering who blogged the video. Thanks, Alan!

(I need to read the news briefs more carefully!)

As a side note, the video is cleverly shot to make the presentation look incredibly dull. Every time I interacted with the audience for a show of hands the camera stayed right on me. Every reaction shot they went for was some bored programmer noodling around on his laptop in the back.

I swear, it was MUCH more engaging in person.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.