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For Better or For Worse to end hybrid

According to Vertura County Star, Lynn Johnston will be ending the hybrid experiment and re-run her feature, For Better or For Worse, when the current story-lines are complete. Universal Press will continue to sell the repeats.

Johnston hasn’t set a specific end date but did start a slow phaseout of the comic in September with a “hybrid” version, alternating new strips with reprints of old ones. The “reruns,” which have a much different look from the current strips because Johnston’s artistic style has evolved, are presented in the guise of Michael Patterson talking to his daughter about his parents when they, like him, were starting a family.

Speaking via phone from her studio in Corbeil, a town in Ontario, Canada, Johnston, 60, said that after tying up loose ends, she plans to stop writing material about the modern-day characters, although she will make a few mainly cosmetic changes to the classic versions. “I’ll fix up some of the old illustrations that I want to improve, and flesh out some story lines,” she said.

The Ventura County Star reports that when the current story-lines are over, they will be dropping the feature entirely.

But Joe Howry, The Star’s editor, said he decided to discontinue the comic after the Patterson saga wraps because he believes that “rehashing old strips” is “unfair to our readers. It is a way to just keep the strip going but not having to do anything new or original.”

The article ends stating that Lynn would be open to letting For Better or For Worse continue if the right person came along.

She’s open to letting another artist write and draw the strip, continuing the cycle with Michael and Deanna’s story, but “only if it were the right person. It really has to come from the heart.”

Community Comments

#1 Dawn Douglass
January/13/2008
@ 1:10 pm

RE: Sheâ??s open to letting another artist write and draw the strip, continuing the cycle with Michael and Deannaâ??s story, but â??only if it were the right person. It really has to come from the heart.â?

If it comes from the heart, then it should be about the artist’s own characters. Michael and Deanna could be any couple.

I’m not totally against legacy strips, as most folks here are, but I think FBOFW is a very poor candidate for a legacy strip. She should let it go.

#2 Chris Hardiman
January/13/2008
@ 1:16 pm

So if I understand this article correctly, she’s not only ending the hybrid experiment, she’s also ending the strip and it’s going to go into reruns forever like “Peanuts” or “Geech.” Unless some other cartoonist wants to take over the reins…? This is a kind of ambiguous announcement.

Also, she explains that it will go into reruns after all the current storylines end. That’s ambiguous as well. Does that mean after Liz and Anthony get married? After April graduates high school (in roughly a year-and-a-half)? Who can tell?

#3 Quint Nelson
January/13/2008
@ 1:39 pm

Well finally, this charade of keeping this strip’s cash flow going will come to an end. The creator must have seen the folly in keeping it alive under such bogus pretense. Frankly, it was hurting her legacy as one of the great comics of all time.

Some coward editors will probably keep running the re-runs for awhile as the elderly wail, but one can only re-read a soap opera for so long. Bring on something NEW!

Now, let somebody else have a shot!

#4 Larry Levine
January/13/2008
@ 3:28 pm

When Lucille Ball tired of the weekly grind from I Love Lucy she turned it into the monthly Lucy-Desi Hour. I think Lynn should turn FBOFW into a webcomic on UPS’ GoComics.com where she could produce new strips at her leisure (e.g. a week’s worth per month).

#5 Dawn Douglass
January/13/2008
@ 6:49 pm

Yeah, right, Larry. I’m sure she wants to go from making around $50,000 a month in newspaper sales to making, what?, 50 bucks from gocomics?

#6 John Read
January/13/2008
@ 7:17 pm

“The strip will not end. I intend to keep the Patterson family around for many years to come.” Ms. Johnston said that, back in August. I can’t help but wonder if her longtime assistant Karen Matchette, who has considerable talent herself, was approached about carrying on the still-popular strip.

#7 Garey Mckee
January/13/2008
@ 7:32 pm

I think we all knew the hybrid format wouldn’t last. I think Karen Matchette carrying on the strip would be a great idea. I would NOT want to see FBOFW recycled and staying on the page taking up space as “Classic FBOFW.” I must admit I do like reading the classic Peanuts strips in the paper, but FBOFW is no Peanuts.

However, as everyone here knows, it all comes down to money. If papers are willing to pay for classic FBOFW then classic FBOFW it will be.

#8 Larry Levine
January/13/2008
@ 7:55 pm

“Iâ??m sure she wants to go from making around $50,000 a month in newspaper sales to making, what?, 50 bucks from gocomics?”

It’s not about the money, it’s about the ART! (proclaimed by a web cartoonist who doesn’t make 50K a month).

#9 D.D.Degg
January/13/2008
@ 8:04 pm

“if her longtime assistant Karen Matchette, who has considerable talent herself…”

I carried on a short email correspondence with the magnanimous Ms. Matchette a few years ago(2005), and then tried to get a few
websites to correct her name from Marchette to Matchette.
At that time she told me she had moved to Canada from 1998 – 2000 to assist Lynn on FBoFW, but then returned to the U.S. – keeping occupied with various freelance projects (one of which was gagwriting for Dennis the Menace, where she had worked earlier in her career).
Has she returned to help Johnston with the strip?

#10 Eric Burke
January/13/2008
@ 9:29 pm

I canâ??t help but wonder if her longtime assistant Karen Matchette, who has considerable talent herself, was approached about carrying on the still-popular strip.

There you go, John. Stay Tooned‘s first hard hitting, investigative story.

Have at it. Bring the truth to the peeps…

#11 Malc McGookin
January/14/2008
@ 6:17 am

Maybe she tried copying Lynn’s style but couldn’t quite matchette.

#12 Eric Burke
January/14/2008
@ 7:10 am

BA-DOOM-PA-CHHHHHHH!

#13 Rick Ellis
January/14/2008
@ 7:39 am

“Sheâ??s open to letting another artist write and draw the strip, continuing the cycle with Michael and Deannaâ??s story, but â??only if it were the right person. It really has to come from the heart.â?

I believe this strip fits her requirements
Pinkerton

#14 h saffell
January/14/2008
@ 7:48 am

Classic FBOFW will be wonderful..I hope she is going this route instead of just totally retireing as Trumbleweeds did.

While I do love Geech, rerun peanuts is terrible. I wish Kudzu would start over and rerun as I came to it late.

Family Tree is a good new one…but some of the new ones are really bad, I mean poor writing, if it could be called that, and even poorer drawing. The new strips, “My Cage”,”Retro Geek”, “Pearls before Swine” fit this catagory. as to Pearls, I think the writer thinks we are the swine and the writer thinks he is the pearl.

OK, I am 65, Grand Avenue is funny, Strange Brew is a true great but Bizarro is a nothing. Age is not a factor in likes, not likes.

#15 Larry Levine
January/14/2008
@ 8:04 am

“Classic FBOFW will be wonderful..I hope she is going this route instead of just totally retiring as Trumbleweeds did”.

Classic FBOFW can be easy enjoyed in Lynn’s numerous book collections. Does anyone buy a newspaper to read 30 plus year old news or sports results? What’s next–newspapers running ‘classic’ Louella Parsons & Hedda Hopper gossip columns? (I can’t wait to read what Cary Grant is up to!)

#16 R Pyle
January/14/2008
@ 9:48 am

Just before the hybrid strips started, I really felt a pang to think that FBOFW was leaving. Now, I just don’t care. Forgot for a while that I hate reruns.

Was it WC Fields who said to go out on top and leave them wanting more? Wrap up your storylines, take a bow and go. Don’t become another Gasoline Alley.

#17 josh s
January/14/2008
@ 10:13 am

I have to say, I was interested to see where the hybrid form would go. It doesn’t seem to have gone anywhere. Then again, Lynn didn’t give it much time to gestate. Did she realize she didn’t want to continue the strip after all? What’s up with the abrupt about-face?

At this point in her career, Lynn could probably suggest anything and the syndicate would be agreeable. And why not? She deserves a break from the endless deadlines and she’s done a great comic strip for many years. I was just thinking how cool it would be to see weekend comics supplements back in newspapers (like Will Eisner’s The Spirit). It would give the artists more space and a whole week to draw a story. A comic like FBOFW would fit into this very well.

#18 David R
January/14/2008
@ 11:40 am

While I love FBOFW, as well as Peanuts, I think this is obviously a disturbing trend that continually, as cartoonists retire or pass away, newspapers continue recycling these classics this way. I understand it’s a business, and that a syndicate is struggling to survive in today’s dwindling climate, and is not about to give up a massive paycheck through re-issuing these strips that can be found in any local bookstore (or on the web) for a new strip/unsure thing, but that’s just it – instead of fostering new and greater talent and promoting it to newspapers and creating THAT sort of climate, there is a lax resting on the familiar here which creates stagnate attitudes and lack of desire for greater work from both cartoonists and syndicates and newspaper editors alike. Imagine if TV just quit making new shows altogether and just did re-runs all the time. Or if there were no new songs and we were stuck listening to the same stuff, albeit great work, still the same songs. This doesn’t happen in other mediums. And it’s so disheartening to up-and-coming cartoonists who not only have to compete against all odds against their fellow cartoonists, but now also against classic, unstoppable re-runs taking up precious shrinking space in so many newspapers.
It makes it impossible to think of comic strips as an artform when I suppose they really are what they were intended to be, based on all this … commercial art at the whim of corporate business.
I tell you… the case for webcomics grows stronger and better every year.

#19 Dave Krainacker
January/14/2008
@ 12:19 pm

“Imagine if TV just quit making new shows altogether and just did re-runs all the time. Or if there were no new songs and we were stuck listening to the same stuff, albeit great work, still the same songs. This doesnâ??t happen in other mediums.”
I’m not sure this is entirely true. “Classic Rock” stations have been playing the same 300 songs since the 1980’s. IPOD’s are popular because people can conveniently recycle the same song ad-infinitum. Old TV shows on DVD have consistenly been selling well. (The only show I’ve watched the past two months is the 2nd season of the “Wild, Wild West from 1966!) And of course people buy movies on DVD so that they can have several showings. Perhaps it has just taken comics a long time to catch up with this trend. The trend is unfortunate, for all the reasons David R. cited, but not unexpected. On the other hand, King Features online has been running classic “Flash Gordon” and “Phantom” strips from the 30’s and 40’s. They are great to read. But they do belong in a current newspaper.

#20 Brian Lager
January/14/2008
@ 12:47 pm

FBOFW “still popular”? Yes, only if you’re counting on morbid curiosity.

#21 David R
January/14/2008
@ 9:30 pm

Yeah, very true, Dave. Good point. I guess the problem I have with it is that newspapers/comics pages have such obviously limited (and shrinking) space to do that sort of thing, whereas TV and Radio and ipods have no limits. Gosh darn it, it ain’t right! ;-)

#22 Miles Stevens
January/16/2008
@ 1:21 am

I find it interesting that someone would want to re-read For Better Or For Worse when they know what is going to happen. It would be like watching a re-run of All My Children or As The World Turns from two years ago.

You already know what is going to happen and “the payoff” is gone.

Enough of this strip taking up space, it’s gotta go! Lynn, please exit stage left gracefully.

Just a comment on a previous posting by h saffell, you’re dissing of Pearls Before Swine is lame. That strip has won Best Comic Strip of the Year twice in past four years at the Reubens and has a huge following. It’s books are best sellers on Amazon. It’s a great strip.

A bit of advice, the next time you post, be credible. Not eveyone has your 65 year old sense of humor. Your generation’s comics already take up too much space in newspapers, let some one else’s voices be heard. Please exit stage left gracefully.

#23 Eric Burke
January/16/2008
@ 4:36 pm

A bit of advice, the next time you post, be credible. Not eveyone has your 65 year old sense of humor.
What an asinine statement. “Be credible”? What does that mean exactly? saffell posted his/her opinion, not an article claiming facts. saffell’s opinion are as “credible” as yours, Miles.

I actually share your opinion about Pearls Before Swine. I think it’s one of the best strips out there today, but I’m also not a fan of My Cage or Retro Geek(Red Meat redux?). FBorFW is one of the all time great strips, although I never liked it. It bores me. The hybrid bores me more. If someone enjoys it in reruns the way I enjoy Seinfeld reruns, despite having seen each episode over and over, good for them.

Exit stage left indeed…criiiiipes…

#24 Dawn Douglass
January/16/2008
@ 5:14 pm

I’m with you, Eric. The “Please exit stage left gracefully” is like telling somebody to drop dead just because they’re a different generation and have different tastes.

Disgusting.

#25 Garey Mckee
January/16/2008
@ 6:48 pm

Wow. This thread has taken a “Logan’s Run” turn for the worse. LOL.

#26 Mike Cope
January/16/2008
@ 7:16 pm

Regarding the last sentence in this article … Can anyone name some other strips that have been handed over to another cartoonist (for writing AND drawing) while the original creator was still alive and well?

My brain is a little tired, so I’m probably forgetting about a few of the obvious ones!

#27 Larry Levine
January/16/2008
@ 8:21 pm

“Can anyone name some other strips that have been handed over to another cartoonist (for writing AND drawing) while the original creator was still alive and well?”

Mutt & Jeff, Dennis the Menace, Gasoline Alley & Sally Forth come to mind.

#28 Chris Hardiman
January/16/2008
@ 8:26 pm

“Rose is Rose,” originally by Pat Brady, now by Don Wimmer.
“The Buckets,” originally by Scott Stantis, now by Greg Cravens.
“Family Circus,” originally by Bil Keane, now by Jeff Keane.
“Sally Forth,” originally by Greg Howard, now by Francesco Marciulano and Craig MacIntosh.
“Beetle Bailey,” originally by Mort Walker, now by Greg Walker.

Those are just a few examples, but I’m sure there are more. It should be noted that there was a relatively high rate of non-death-related turnover in the action/adventure newspaper strips of the ’30s and ’40s, including “Flash Gordon,” “Secret Agent X-9,” and “The Phantom.”

#29 John Read
January/16/2008
@ 8:35 pm

I believe Mort still draws “Beetle Bailey.”

#30 Chris Hardiman
January/16/2008
@ 8:49 pm

You’re right, John; Mort still draws “Beetle” although his sons Brian and Greg do assist him. I think I meant to say “Hi and Lois,” which is now done completely by Brian and Greg Walker and Chase Browne, the son of Dik Browne.

#31 Larry Levine
January/16/2008
@ 8:49 pm

Mort Walker still pencils Beetle Bailey & I believe Pat Brady still writes Rose is Rose.

#32 Mike Wilson
January/17/2008
@ 2:28 am

Its always interesting to see what strips others like and why (referring to the comments made by saffell and Eric, upthread)I never really cared for FBoFW myself, but then, I’m not into drama type strips that much. And I’m in the camp that thinks strips should end and bow out gracefully when the creator retires or passes away. Lynn has made a huge achievement and she should be proud of it, but if she’s done with FBoFW she should let it go. Not just for the space considerations, (though that is a big concern to me, I’ll admit) but because it was HER creation. Its only my opinion, of course, but handing it over to someone else would make any strip a pale shadow of its original self, and maintained really only to be a cash cow. I can’t stomach Garfield mainly for that reason. Theres no real heart to it, its just merchandising. I’d support a crappy strip with stick figures if the creator was sincere.

Man, i’m rambling, I’m sorry. too much caffiene. I’d better just get back to work. :)

#33 R Pyle
January/17/2008
@ 7:50 am

> â??Rose is Rose,â? originally by Pat Brady, now by Don Wimmer.

That kind of explains something for me. I thought at the beginning that strip had a little bit of a dark side where the husband was concerned. Now it’s way too sugary for my taste.

#34 Dawn Douglass
January/17/2008
@ 8:39 am

I don’t know about that. It’s always been sugary. Long before Don Wimmer took over, I remember saying I needed a shot of insulin to read it.

Does anybody know why Pat Brady quit doing it?

#35 Larry Levine
January/17/2008
@ 8:57 am

“Does anybody know why Pat Brady quit doing it?”

Here’s what Pat Brady said on 5/27/05 on Suzanne Tobin’s Washington Post/Meet the Comics site:

Pat Brady: I did Rose is Rose unassisted for 20 years. I wanted to try some other pursuits, which I am now involved in. Bringing in another cartoonist allowed this to happen. I still have a hand in the strip every day.

#36 Dawn Douglass
January/17/2008
@ 10:09 am

Oh, cool, thanks Larry.

Gosh, I didn’t really that Rose is Rose is that old.

#37 Mike Wilson
January/17/2008
@ 10:16 am

Geez, neither did I. Twenty years? Wow. I thought Rose is Rose was maybe 10 years old at the most. I wonder to what extent Brady is still involved.

#38 Chris Hardiman
January/17/2008
@ 3:48 pm

“Rose is Rose” is twenty years old?! No kidding, I thought that started in about 1988 — oh wait, that IS twenty years ago. Yikes.

Anyway, “Rose is Rose” is has always been one of the better-drawn strips in the newspaper, but in terms of pure content I’ve always found it mostly too saccharine for my taste. I’m not sure how long ago Pasquale’s cousin Clem was introduced to the strip, but his (her? I actually can’t tell) occasional appearances inject a little bit of darkness and realism into the strip. Clem is a spoiled brat and an extremely selfish pig, but even if the character is a little detestable his presence is welcome in a strip where everyone else is spurting sunshine and rainbows. I don’t know if Jimbo used to be darker, but he certainly isn’t anymore. The one thing that really irritates me in the strip, however, is not the sugariness but the toddler character, Mimi. She talks in baby talk all the time and, in case you don’t understand what she’s saying, the character she’s speaking to always repeats what she says normally. I’ve read that for the first years of the strip Pasquale was the same way. Well, if the strip centered around him and not Rose as much as it largely does today, I don’t know if I could have stood reading any of it back in the ’80s.

Not all newspapers do this, but mine gives full co-creator credit to Wimmer in the byline. Not all of these strips that were turned over pre-death do that, however; Bil Keane is still the only name in the “Family Circus” byline. And oddly enough, my paper gives credit to the writer of “Sally Forth” (Marciulano) but no credit to the artist (MacIntosh) or the original creator.

How do you think these “replacement cartoonists” should be credited by newspapers? Should they get co-author credit, full credit, or no credit at all (simply sign the panel or even just ghost it)? And which is appropriate for Lynn Johnston and Karen Matchette, should Matchette choose to carry on the strip?

#39 louisdpdl
January/17/2008
@ 4:21 pm

“The one thing that really irritates me in the strip, however, is not the sugariness but the toddler character, Mimi. She talks in baby talk all the time and, in case you donâ??t understand what sheâ??s saying, the character sheâ??s speaking to always repeats what she says normally. Iâ??ve read that for the first years of the strip Pasquale was the same way. Well, if the strip centered around him and not Rose as much as it largely does today, I donâ??t know if I could have stood reading any of it back in the â??80s.”

Actually, strange as this may sound, Pasquale’s character had a lot more charm back when he spoke baby-speak. Yes, the characters did seem somewhat darker – or less sugary, at least. I used to really like the comic; now I can’t stand it. I finally understand why – a completely different writer at the helm, and it shows.

#40 Garey Mckee
January/17/2008
@ 5:05 pm

‘â??Rose is Roseâ? is twenty years old?! No kidding, I thought that started in about 1988 â?? oh wait, that IS twenty years ago. Yikes. ‘

I agree Chris, time flies when you’re having fun. I also agree that if I were to compile a list of the best drawn strips, Rose is Rose would be right up there. I’ve always liked the sharp perspective used in many of the panels. For reasons of clarity and logistics, you just don’t see that in comic strips these days.

#41 Jeff Vella
January/17/2008
@ 5:54 pm

“I also agree that if I were to compile a list of the best drawn strips, Rose is Rose would be right up there.”

Yeah, I especially like when they feature “Viki”, Rose’s punk biker “Alter Ego”. AAAHH, nothings says “family comic strip” like a leather clad biker chick in a mini skirt. Hubba-Hubba!

#42 Chris Hardiman
January/17/2008
@ 6:14 pm

Jeff,
There’s another sign of the changes under Mr. Wimmer:
The apparent disappearance of Vicki. Rose’s biker chick alter ego hardly ever appears anymore.

Garey,
Both Brady and Wimmer are tremendous artists. Their use of perspective always astounds me; few cartoonists use much more than the side view these days. Another one of those great cartoonists when it comes to perspective is Wiley Miller. Sometimes I’m just amazed by the different angles that he and the “Rose is Rose” guys use.

louisdpdl,
That’s interesting. I haven’t read very much of the early “Rose is Rose,” so wouldn’t know about whether he was more or less charming as a toddler. I do agree that it has gotten progressively more sugary.

Does anyone know if Pasquale’s cousin Clem is supposed to be a boy or a girl? Now that I’ve realized that I don’t know, I’m really bothered by it. I’ve always thought “boy,” but I realize that Clem could be a girl as well. Anybody?

#43 Eric Burke
January/17/2008
@ 6:44 pm

I thought that Pat brady brought in Wimmer due to health reasons? And i thought Brady still wrote it and Wimmer illustrates it?

I really like Rose Is Rose back when Pasquale spoke baby-speak. His episodes are the best in the strip. It’s usually dull now, but I agree on the art…mainly pre-Wimmer(who has done a nice job matching Pat Brady’s style). Rose Is Rose used to feature really creative camera angles and designs…less now…

#44 Chris Hardiman
January/17/2008
@ 8:07 pm

Eric wrote: “I thought that Pat brady brought in Wimmer due to health reasons? And I thought Brady still wrote it and Wimmer illustrates it?”

As Larry wrote above, Brady brought in Wimmer so he could get involved in other pursuits. I’m not sure if his age and/or health played a role in his decision. I can answer your second question with a quote from a 2005 Washington Post “Meet the Cartoonist” session:

“Although I’m not dead yet, Don Wimmer’s work is now appearing in Rose is Rose, as of March 1 of 2004. If the characters and themes can be preserved in a case like this, everybody wins.” –Pat Brady, 2005

He specifically refers to modern-day “Rose is Rose” as Don Wimmer’s work. So it sounds like even if he does have a hand in every strip, the writing AND art is largely done by Wimmer.

#45 Garey Mckee
January/17/2008
@ 8:37 pm

“Another one of those great cartoonists when it comes to perspective is Wiley Miller.”

Definately, Chris. Wiley’s use of perspective is very natural. Since we were just talking about editorial cartoons on another thread here, I’ll say that Wiley’s layouts and subsequent excellence when it comes to perspective seems to me to be due to his background in editorial cartooning. I would go so far to say as that most editorial cartoonists have to have an above average mastery of layout and perspective.

#46 Hugh G. Rection
January/17/2008
@ 9:23 pm

Please encourage Lynnuck to back away from Foob and let it die. If I really miss it, I’ll just whack myself about the head with a heavy rubber mallet to simulate the feeling I get from reading her insipid, sappy, preachy, lame garbage.

#47 Chris Hardiman
January/17/2008
@ 9:59 pm

Garey,
Could it be because editorial cartoons are only one panel, and that panel is bigger than an entire comic strip typically? I think those conditions allow them to experiment more with perspective and move beyond the “talking heads” that dominate the newspaper comics pages today. That’s an interesting theory you’ve got there.

On a side note, I found out using Wikipedia that Clem is male. THat’s what I thought. But I wasn’t sure…

#48 Rick Stromoski
January/18/2008
@ 5:48 am

Hey Hugh, what are you …twelve? Brave words when you flame under a phony name… Isn’t there a way to set this board up where anonymous posting isn’t possible?

#49 Tom Heintjes
January/18/2008
@ 7:06 am

I have nothing but respect for Lynn Johnston’s achievement, and I understand the syndicate’s desire to hold onto its massive client list, but I also see how many people wouldn’t follow a story strip the second time around.

Re: Mr. Rection…who let the dogs in?

#50 Wiley Miller
January/18/2008
@ 7:27 am

Lynn is still alive, it’s her feature, she can do with it what she wants. You don’t have to read it.

#51 Hugh G. Rection
January/18/2008
@ 3:39 pm


Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#52 Malc McGookin
January/18/2008
@ 8:11 pm

There is actually a rule on this board which I’m surprised hasn’t been upheld, that only full (and real) names for posters are allowed.

Mr Rection is obviously a blow-in who, for the time being, has evaded the long arm of the moderator.

It’s obvious from his grammar and use of language that he has intelligence, at least of a type, but the nature of his posts is overblown, he has an obsession with mutiple “joke”-within-a-joke sentences, the character of his sophomoric thought processes swerves wildly as he attempts to focus, and he is determined that he is, despite all evidence to the contrary, funny.

All these reveal him as someone suffering from a mental condition , probably psychotic. I’m not sure we should have to deal with every knobhead who wants to post on these boards, but if we must, I’d like to know who they really are.

#53 Hugh G. Rection
January/19/2008
@ 6:08 am


Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#54 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 6:50 am

No, I don’t believe I could teach you anything about humour, Keith. You are a lost soul adrift in a sea of confusion, blown by the wind of….well, your own making, shall we say.

#55 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 6:51 am

Oh, my manners.

Bon voyage.

#56 Rick Stromoski
January/19/2008
@ 7:06 am

>>>Dick. Not sure what part of Canada you are in, but here in the USA we are free to express our opinions. You might not like my opinion, but thatâ??s just too bad for you. Not sure which of my comments was â??brave,â? since I didnâ??t threaten anyone.

Missing the point all together, my original post wasn’t directed at what the troll was saying but rather that he was saying so under a false identity. When cloaked in the protection of anonymity one can be very “brave” in voicing inflammatory and personal attacks because then they’re not accountable.

#57 Hugh G. Rection
January/19/2008
@ 7:13 am

Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#58 Hugh G. Rection
January/19/2008
@ 7:30 am

Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#59 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 9:46 am

Have fun while you can. As soon as Alan gets back, you’ll be gone, I’m sure.

#60 Hugh G. Rection
January/19/2008
@ 11:56 am

Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#61 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 3:41 pm

As for Mr Rection accusing others of being smug and self righteous…Mr Pot, meet Mr Kettle.

#62 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 3:53 pm

Actually, Malky, he’s acting little different than you did on Toontalk.

#63 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 5:05 pm

You too, Dawn.

#64 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 5:53 pm

Nice try, but responding to constant attacks didn’t make me the troll, just your favorite target.

#65 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 7:09 pm

Dawn, to be brutally honest I don’t want to speak to you at all. Could you just sort of ignore me too? That would be cool, thanks.

#66 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 7:52 pm

You might notice that I have been ever since you got here…far be it from me to contribute to you getting kicked off yet another cartoon site…but that “pot calling the kettle black” remark was a bit too much to let pass. :)

#67 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 8:14 pm

Okay, my last remark wasn’t very nice. I apologize.

Don’t worry, you can count on me staying clear of you, always.

#68 Hugh G. Rection
January/19/2008
@ 8:21 pm

Editor’s note: “Hugh’s” comment has been removed for violation of commenting rules.

#69 Malc McGookin
January/19/2008
@ 8:43 pm

“far be it from me to contribute to you getting kicked off yet another cartoon site”

Dawn, you just can’t help yourself going that step too far. I’ve never been kicked off any cartoon site.
You’ve said your last remark “wasn’t very nice” but it was more than that, it was a libel.

I suggest you clarify your remark, or provide proof as quick as you can, because this is a new site, and I suspect that you’re already regretting posting a smear on a site you can’t edit.

For all those who are reading this unfortunate set of posts, let me say this, before the thread is (unfortunately but understandably) deleted or edited.
These kinds of “debates”, shall we say, often attract eyeballs and increase hits to site or a thread, from rubberneckers and lurkers who love to see other people go at it. That might be a boost in the short term but in the long term it ruins a site, its reputation and its future.

It’s perfectly obvious to me that Alan doesn’t want that kind of debate, nor that kind of poster (anonymous, especially).

Vigorous debate or robust, honestly felt opinions are one thing, but anonymous egoists or needlessly spiteful posts make everyone feel bad.

I’d hate it if it came down to people being reluctant to even enter a thread because of whoever’s already there.

#70 Dawn Douglass
January/19/2008
@ 9:47 pm

You said: “Iâ??d hate it if it came down to people being reluctant to even enter a thread because of whoeverâ??s already there.”

I know several people who left TT because of you, Malky, myself included. I can only hope you now truly mean what you say about not wanting to make everyone feel bad.

That’s why I do regret what I said. Not because it isn’t true, but because I believe in giving people a clean slate, and I shouldn’t have made that mark against you, when some people here don’t know you from other sites. I do sincerely apologize for that and I encourage Alan to delete it.

One thing I did always respect about you is that you were at least honest about your identity.

#71 Alan Gardner
January/19/2008
@ 9:59 pm

My apologies to regular visitors who had to suffer through the deteriorating thread these last couple of days while I’ve been traveling and not always near a computer/internet. I will be on the road home tomorrow (Sunday), and will not be able to monitor the conversations. I will delete derogatory posts if they continue.

Thank you all for reminding visitors to use their REAL first and last names. I’m grateful for the “community watch” we have going here.

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