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Scott Adams’ voice returns

Scott Adams, on his blog yesterday, explains how he is getting his voice back. If you weren’t aware of his condition, he explains that to.

The treatment involves Botox? injections to the vocal cords several times a year. Botox temporarily deadens the muscles that cause the spasms that choke off the voice. Apparently those muscles aren?t good for much besides misbehaving, so you can stun them with minimal side effects.

If you?re squeamish, skip this paragraph. I?m going to describe the process. The neurologist sticks two electronic sensors on my neck so she can determine when the needle is in the right spot. Then she gives me a local anesthetic on the neck below the adam?s apple. This is just preparation for the bigger and nastier needle that will deliver the Botox. The Botox needle goes through the front of the neck and then she works it toward the inside back of the throat where the vocal cords are. When she?s near the right spot, she tells me to say ?eeeee.? Then when the needle touches the right place, her electronic gizmo goes all static and she plunges in for the first shot. The needle stays in the front of my neck as she maneuvers it to the other side of the inside of my throat and repeats. It doesn?t hurt as much as it would seem, but the creepy factor is through the roof. You can feel the needle inside your neck the whole time. The ?bad part? takes about 60 seconds, and believe it or not, you can actually get used to it. Kind of.

Community Comments

#1 Joe Hanink
August/1/2008
@ 7:09 am

Hello. To anyone reading this. The case of Scott Adams’ voice recovery is truly remarkable. I happened upon this news some time ago, when I was suffering with severe spasmodic dysphonia myself… before I knew it had a name. I visited Dr. Morton Cooper in Los Angeles and read his book about what this condition really is and how it can be cured. I had experienced the full onslaught of the condition and had noticed its strange oddities. For example, singing, speaking in accent, and certain rhymes were effortless, yet normal conversational speech was literally impossible. It was definitely a case of “voice suicide”.

Today, I am here to say that being informed by Dr. Cooper’s studies, Scott Adams’ encouraging experience, and by applying a combination of strategies, I am nearly fully recovered. At first, it was extremely frustrating, and I had no guarantees of success, yet I had confidence that it was possible, so I kept hope and eventually, I started seeing results. It took exactly one year of active and passive approaches. I also forced myself to read a story to my 3 year old daughter every night for some time, using that as an opportunity for safe and reflective practice.

I am now able to do many things that I could simply not do at all, including

a) ordering pizza on the phone
b) communicating in office meetings
c) ordering coffee at starbucks
d) chatting with the family
e) normal everyday conversation

I am ordinarily very chatty, and similar to Scott Adams, I have bad allergies. Maybe I got lucky, and maybe this thing was able to heal after some time, but I can say beyond any doubt that Dr. Cooper’s analysis and strategies are real and efficacious.

My name is Joe Hanink, and feel free to contact me personally at zergworld@hotmail.com

P.S., I am amazed by Scott Cooper’s self-help, and I feel no less amazed at my own personal recovery. I would add to Scott’s assessment of the nursery rhyme the opinion that those particular verses are composed of sounds that emanate principally from the “mask” (versus the lower throat). By applying that basic and simple principle, I have reached where I am today. The application of this rule and the careful voice-consciousness that’s required is not itself easy at first, but it becomes habitual, easier, and natural after time. Just like one with a broken leg may need to learn to walk again by becoming intimately in-tune with one’s body and motions… like a pool player learning a different stroke… like a budding musician, it takes patience, practice, and quiet self-conscious reflection to become in tune with your voice. With that said, rest assured that you can succeed.

#2 Joe Hanink
August/1/2008
@ 1:09 am

Hello. To anyone reading this. The case of Scott Adams’ voice recovery is truly remarkable. I happened upon this news some time ago, when I was suffering with severe spasmodic dysphonia myself… before I knew it had a name. I visited Dr. Morton Cooper in Los Angeles and read his book about what this condition really is and how it can be cured. I had experienced the full onslaught of the condition and had noticed its strange oddities. For example, singing, speaking in accent, and certain rhymes were effortless, yet normal conversational speech was literally impossible. It was definitely a case of “voice suicide”.

Today, I am here to say that being informed by Dr. Cooper’s studies, Scott Adams’ encouraging experience, and by applying a combination of strategies, I am nearly fully recovered. At first, it was extremely frustrating, and I had no guarantees of success, yet I had confidence that it was possible, so I kept hope and eventually, I started seeing results. It took exactly one year of active and passive approaches. I also forced myself to read a story to my 3 year old daughter every night for some time, using that as an opportunity for safe and reflective practice.

I am now able to do many things that I could simply not do at all, including

a) ordering pizza on the phone
b) communicating in office meetings
c) ordering coffee at starbucks
d) chatting with the family
e) normal everyday conversation

I am ordinarily very chatty, and similar to Scott Adams, I have bad allergies. Maybe I got lucky, and maybe this thing was able to heal after some time, but I can say beyond any doubt that Dr. Cooper’s analysis and strategies are real and efficacious.

My name is Joe Hanink, and feel free to contact me personally at zergworld@hotmail.com

P.S., I am amazed by Scott Cooper’s self-help, and I feel no less amazed at my own personal recovery. I would add to Scott’s assessment of the nursery rhyme the opinion that those particular verses are composed of sounds that emanate principally from the “mask” (versus the lower throat). By applying that basic and simple principle, I have reached where I am today. The application of this rule and the careful voice-consciousness that’s required is not itself easy at first, but it becomes habitual, easier, and natural after time. Just like one with a broken leg may need to learn to walk again by becoming intimately in-tune with one’s body and motions… like a pool player learning a different stroke… like a budding musician, it takes patience, practice, and quiet self-conscious reflection to become in tune with your voice. With that said, rest assured that you can succeed.

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