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Quick Hitting Miscellaneous Updates

A few updates to previously mentioned items.

 

Rube Goldberg knew how to get from A to B using all the letters in the alphabet

Stephen Silver, for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, profiles Rube and reviews an exhibition.

“The Art of Rube Goldberg,” an exhibition that…runs through Jan. 21 at the Philadelphia museum. The exhibit, which follows stops at museums in San Francisco and Chicago but features some new items, is the first major exhibition of Goldberg’s work since the Smithsonian presented one shortly before his death.

 

 

An Ancient Roman Comic Strip With Speech Bubbles

Atlas Obscura weighs in on

A recently unearthed Roman tomb in the northern Jordanian town of Beit Ras features a collection of striking, sequential paintings complete with speech-filled captions, forming what looks to many like an ancient, proto-comic strip.

Of course there are no speech balloons, but if the Bayeux Tapestry can be called a comic strip…

 

 

Monsters of the Midway

The Chicago Bears, of the National Football League, continue their season long comic strip.

 

 

Roz Chast is a Visionary Woman

Pat Loeb for KYA Radio writes about her meeting cartoonist Roz Chast.

on the occasion of her winning a Visionary Woman Award from Moore College of Art

 

 

It’s a good reminder that supernatural things are happening

Dave Hrbacek, for the Catholic News Service, writes that Angelic Twaddle by Louis Hall continues to “show eternity and everyday life from an angelic perspective.”

 

 

“The Ghastlygun Tinies,” MAD magazine’s mordant riff on The Gashlycrumb Tinies

Marc Dery, for Hyperallergic, explores the horrifying MAD parody and the dark Gorey inspiration.

A writer for the parenting website website Fatherly noted in an item about MAD’s somber parody, that the magazine had “used nostalgia about a beloved kids book to make a very unfunny statement [that] forced their readers to pay attention” to school shootings. This inspires an aside: Has The Ghashlycrumb Tinies really become “a beloved kids book”? When Simon and Schuster published it in 1963, they deemed it too dark for children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Comments

#1 Will Henry
October/24/2018
@ 10:11 pm

that MAD piece was HEAAAVVVY

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