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‘Funky Winkerbean’ cancer story line follows creator’s own battle

“Funky Winkerbean” creator Tom Batiuk’s own fight with cancer triggered a story line in which character Lisa Moore has her cancer return. The 59-year-old Batiuk was diagnosed with prostate cancer three years ago.

Community Comments

#1 Yvonne Snell
December/8/2006
@ 2:11 am

Please please do not let Lisa die in this comic strip. There are many of us who have survived cancer, and many who continue the battle. If Lisa dies it is a loss of hope. Don’t let Wally die in Iraq either!!!
Thanks,
Yvonne Snell

#2 Yvonne Snell
December/7/2006
@ 7:11 pm

Please please do not let Lisa die in this comic strip. There are many of us who have survived cancer, and many who continue the battle. If Lisa dies it is a loss of hope. Don’t let Wally die in Iraq either!!!
Thanks,
Yvonne Snell

#3 Andy
January/31/2007
@ 2:47 pm

Thank you, Tom, for letting us share your experience through Lisa’s story. I have not been so moved by a story in a cartoon since the story of BD’s injury in Iraq in Doonesbury.

#4 Andy
January/31/2007
@ 7:47 am

Thank you, Tom, for letting us share your experience through Lisa’s story. I have not been so moved by a story in a cartoon since the story of BD’s injury in Iraq in Doonesbury.

#5 ann carole moylan
February/28/2007
@ 12:42 pm

I will have to admit that I am not a huge comic page reader and it was only by accident that I recently came on the strip about Lisa and her cancer experience. Having recently completed the chemo cycle and after effects I was struck how real her portrayl is right down to the neuropathy in her feet!! There is no uniqueness to any of us. Are you sure you are not looking over my shoulder?? Thank you

#6 ann carole moylan
February/28/2007
@ 5:42 am

I will have to admit that I am not a huge comic page reader and it was only by accident that I recently came on the strip about Lisa and her cancer experience. Having recently completed the chemo cycle and after effects I was struck how real her portrayl is right down to the neuropathy in her feet!! There is no uniqueness to any of us. Are you sure you are not looking over my shoulder?? Thank you

#7 liz
February/28/2007
@ 6:25 am

I just lost my best friend in the world to breast cancer Sat. 2-24. She was only 41 and leaves 3 young children. I have found Lisa’s storyline
an amazingly accurate portrayal of what my friend experienced. Now I understand why the
perspective was so on target. I wish Tom all the best and hope both his storylines – Lisa’s
and his own personal journey – have a happier ending.

#8 Bev
March/18/2007
@ 7:28 am

Thank you for not letting Lisa die when her cancer recurred. I am a cancer survivor. \It gives hope to all of us fighting the dread disease. I not only follow Lisa’s story, I purchased the paperback book regarding her cancer.

#9 Teresa
June/19/2007
@ 10:56 pm

I hope Lisa has a bright future after enduring so much. I would also love it if she had her son were reunited. I’ve always been hoping for that one too.

#10 Teresa
June/19/2007
@ 4:56 pm

I hope Lisa has a bright future after enduring so much. I would also love it if she had her son were reunited. I’ve always been hoping for that one too.

#11 Rich
July/3/2007
@ 1:03 pm

Tom,
I doubt there is a single cancer victim following Lisa’s story that doesn’t already know that too many cancers are fatal. Please, have some pity on your readers with this dreaded disease and give them some hope that miracles can and DO happen (this from a non-religious guy whose wife (a fan of yours) was stricken with stage IIIC endometrial cancer 2 years ago.)
I UNDERSTAND your strip reflects real life…but focusing on the negative only emphasizes what we experience in ‘real’ life..there is SO much negativity around sometimes its a pleasure to hear of something positive we can hope for.
Please, let Lisa live and inspire your readers (or at least don’t present them with more dread and sorrow). I repeat, they are too aware of the down side of cancer.

ps…good luck with your own battle….

Rich

#12 Rich
July/3/2007
@ 7:03 am

Tom,
I doubt there is a single cancer victim following Lisa’s story that doesn’t already know that too many cancers are fatal. Please, have some pity on your readers with this dreaded disease and give them some hope that miracles can and DO happen (this from a non-religious guy whose wife (a fan of yours) was stricken with stage IIIC endometrial cancer 2 years ago.)
I UNDERSTAND your strip reflects real life…but focusing on the negative only emphasizes what we experience in ‘real’ life..there is SO much negativity around sometimes its a pleasure to hear of something positive we can hope for.
Please, let Lisa live and inspire your readers (or at least don’t present them with more dread and sorrow). I repeat, they are too aware of the down side of cancer.

ps…good luck with your own battle….

Rich

#13 Barrett
July/3/2007
@ 7:18 pm

I am deeply grieved to think that Lisa will be allowed to die – I was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, and have followed this story for many years. It has been a source of hope to me and to others who are battling this disease. I am asking that you reconsider killing her off, whether by cancer or any other way – let her be a shining beacon for those of us in this life and death struggle.

#14 Barrett
July/3/2007
@ 1:18 pm

I am deeply grieved to think that Lisa will be allowed to die – I was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, and have followed this story for many years. It has been a source of hope to me and to others who are battling this disease. I am asking that you reconsider killing her off, whether by cancer or any other way – let her be a shining beacon for those of us in this life and death struggle.

#15 Matt Killeen
July/3/2007
@ 10:24 pm

I think it would be gutsy and honest to allow the character to die.

#16 Matt Killeen
July/3/2007
@ 4:24 pm

I think it would be gutsy and honest to allow the character to die.

#17 Linda
July/4/2007
@ 3:07 am

Lisa has been an inspiration with her courage and sense of humor. Life is so full of difficulties, that reading Lisa’s story brings hope and a pleasant respite. Please let her live. A lot of people need her to live.

#18 Linda
July/3/2007
@ 9:07 pm

Lisa has been an inspiration with her courage and sense of humor. Life is so full of difficulties, that reading Lisa’s story brings hope and a pleasant respite. Please let her live. A lot of people need her to live.

#19 lefitte
July/4/2007
@ 6:06 am

I think a strip that shows a character who dies with strength and dignity will elevate itself to level sp far beyond the cliches of every other strip. And instead of being just a trivial moment of our day … maybe it will verge on something deeper. No Hollywood endings. Real life. And I’d salute Funky and Batiuk for the courage it takes to do it.

#20 lefitte
July/4/2007
@ 12:06 am

I think a strip that shows a character who dies with strength and dignity will elevate itself to level sp far beyond the cliches of every other strip. And instead of being just a trivial moment of our day … maybe it will verge on something deeper. No Hollywood endings. Real life. And I’d salute Funky and Batiuk for the courage it takes to do it.

#21 Sandman
July/5/2007
@ 3:14 am

I agree with those who say that Lisa should live as a symbol of hope to those battling cancer. I lost my mom to bone cancer, and I can categorically say that it won’t make me feel one iota better to watch Batiuk kill off Lisa before our eyes. And don’t give me that crap about it being gutsy, or honest, or real life, or how courageous it is to kill off a character like Lisa. I don’t read the comics to be depressed.

#22 Sandman
July/4/2007
@ 9:14 pm

I agree with those who say that Lisa should live as a symbol of hope to those battling cancer. I lost my mom to bone cancer, and I can categorically say that it won’t make me feel one iota better to watch Batiuk kill off Lisa before our eyes. And don’t give me that crap about it being gutsy, or honest, or real life, or how courageous it is to kill off a character like Lisa. I don’t read the comics to be depressed.

#23 Joanne Mrazik
July/5/2007
@ 10:33 pm

I am a cancer survivor and I still attend a support group. I know that my fellow cancer conquerors would agree with me that “all cancer patients do not die”; many survive and it is so important for those who are newly diagnosed or who are fighting this disease to have hope and to KNOW that there are many of us out there with all types of cancer who are living joyful lives 5, 10, 20 years or more later. I have always enjoyed the comic strip and follow Lisa’s story closely and it brings me to tears often when I remember the fear, the pain, and the joy that we all go through. Please re-think this and let Lisa live. Thank you for your many thought-provoking story lines. My prayers and thoughts are with you during your battle and your upcoming victory. God bless. Jojo

#24 Joanne Mrazik
July/5/2007
@ 4:33 pm

I am a cancer survivor and I still attend a support group. I know that my fellow cancer conquerors would agree with me that “all cancer patients do not die”; many survive and it is so important for those who are newly diagnosed or who are fighting this disease to have hope and to KNOW that there are many of us out there with all types of cancer who are living joyful lives 5, 10, 20 years or more later. I have always enjoyed the comic strip and follow Lisa’s story closely and it brings me to tears often when I remember the fear, the pain, and the joy that we all go through. Please re-think this and let Lisa live. Thank you for your many thought-provoking story lines. My prayers and thoughts are with you during your battle and your upcoming victory. God bless. Jojo

#25 John
July/7/2007
@ 3:42 am

My mother died of breast cancer, but having Lisa being told her cancer had disappeared, then told it was a mistake and that her cancer is now terminal, is, IMO, just sadistic. If this indeed follows your own experience, then again IMO, you’re just taking out your own bitterness needlessly by manipulating the emotions of others.

#26 John
July/6/2007
@ 9:42 pm

My mother died of breast cancer, but having Lisa being told her cancer had disappeared, then told it was a mistake and that her cancer is now terminal, is, IMO, just sadistic. If this indeed follows your own experience, then again IMO, you’re just taking out your own bitterness needlessly by manipulating the emotions of others.

#27 Andy
July/8/2007
@ 3:09 pm

I wept this morning as I read about Lisa being ready to let go. So many people who have commented want her to live because that’s what would make them feel better. At least one person says they don’t read the strip to be depressed. These people have fallen into the trap of thinking that comic strips are only about the lighthearted and trivial, while so many of them, like Doonesberry, have a subversive intent that reflects our real lives. Think how powerful the strip was when BD got shot in Iraq. Fans wept. Look at how the strip is covering his post-war struggles. In this story Doonesberry has risen above commenting on our mundane conflicts and concerns to address the very heart of our political life – consequences of bad judgment. In the best of all possible worlds, no one gets shot, no one suffers. And people with cancer always live. I empathize deeply for those who have had cancer and are anquished over Lisa’s suffering. Yes, many do live, but many die, and their families must learn to go on bravely. Is that not the greatest of human stories? Bless you, Tom, for elevating your sweet cartoon to an honest art that elevates us all. You are a brave artist who understands what art is for.

#28 Andy
July/8/2007
@ 9:09 am

I wept this morning as I read about Lisa being ready to let go. So many people who have commented want her to live because that’s what would make them feel better. At least one person says they don’t read the strip to be depressed. These people have fallen into the trap of thinking that comic strips are only about the lighthearted and trivial, while so many of them, like Doonesberry, have a subversive intent that reflects our real lives. Think how powerful the strip was when BD got shot in Iraq. Fans wept. Look at how the strip is covering his post-war struggles. In this story Doonesberry has risen above commenting on our mundane conflicts and concerns to address the very heart of our political life – consequences of bad judgment. In the best of all possible worlds, no one gets shot, no one suffers. And people with cancer always live. I empathize deeply for those who have had cancer and are anquished over Lisa’s suffering. Yes, many do live, but many die, and their families must learn to go on bravely. Is that not the greatest of human stories? Bless you, Tom, for elevating your sweet cartoon to an honest art that elevates us all. You are a brave artist who understands what art is for.

#29 Garey Mckee
July/9/2007
@ 7:54 pm

I’ve remained silent on this topic here at The Daily Cartoonist because I’ve been mulling it over for quite some time.

The debate that has kind of surfaced is a valid one. If Lisa were allowed to live in the comic strip it would indeed provide hope for people struggling with cancer in their own lives. A struggle I have witnessed first hand.

However, speaking as a cartoonist, one of the things that we do with our art is to use it as a release for own fears, doubts and anger. Perhaps Lisa not surviving in the comic strip would serve as a catharsis for Tom’s own doubts and fears as he struggles with cancer, thereby enabling him to let those negative feelings go and concentrate on survival and recovery.

#30 Garey Mckee
July/9/2007
@ 1:54 pm

I’ve remained silent on this topic here at The Daily Cartoonist because I’ve been mulling it over for quite some time.

The debate that has kind of surfaced is a valid one. If Lisa were allowed to live in the comic strip it would indeed provide hope for people struggling with cancer in their own lives. A struggle I have witnessed first hand.

However, speaking as a cartoonist, one of the things that we do with our art is to use it as a release for own fears, doubts and anger. Perhaps Lisa not surviving in the comic strip would serve as a catharsis for Tom’s own doubts and fears as he struggles with cancer, thereby enabling him to let those negative feelings go and concentrate on survival and recovery.

#31 Rich
July/10/2007
@ 1:51 pm

>

Andy,

I have been an artist for nearly 40 years and I still have no idea what Art is for . I do believe that “art” purposely designed to make people think borders on propaganda (not meant in the cold war sense) or editorial opinion….but I begin think that is no longer Art. I once had a prof many moons ago that insisted that if art had a purpose it was no longer Art ….(keep in mind it was the 1960’s and everyone who had an opinion to express thought they were Artists.
Personally I like to see editorial opinion kept to the editorial page. That is where “real life” belongs….the comic page…well….I don’t know. Doonsbury (which was mentioned on this forum) always appears on the editorial page here (much like Pogo used to)….
However… I must admit I enjoy seeing Funky in the comic section….its just when it approaches an area where it could benefit people reading it by taking a positive route, I think it falls flat when it takes the “artistic” negative route to kill off a character with a disease that everyone has “known” for decades to be a death warrant..and unfortunately that’s still the prevalent belief. Tom could not only inspire those with this dreaded to disease by allowing Lisa to live as well as educate the public that its NOT the death warrant diagnosis it once was.
I guess I don’t like to cringe when I open the comic section. I save my cringing for the front page of my newspaper….after that I need a relief..not more of the same.

I guess everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I have found as I have become a crotchety old fart that positive inspiration is a more powerful tool than hitting one over the head with negative reality. A positive outlook is SO important when treating this disease. If you can’t find positive in the comic section….you might as well read the front page and know that the world sucks.

Let Lisa Live!
Rich

#32 Rich
July/10/2007
@ 7:51 am

>

Andy,

I have been an artist for nearly 40 years and I still have no idea what Art is for . I do believe that “art” purposely designed to make people think borders on propaganda (not meant in the cold war sense) or editorial opinion….but I begin think that is no longer Art. I once had a prof many moons ago that insisted that if art had a purpose it was no longer Art ….(keep in mind it was the 1960’s and everyone who had an opinion to express thought they were Artists.
Personally I like to see editorial opinion kept to the editorial page. That is where “real life” belongs….the comic page…well….I don’t know. Doonsbury (which was mentioned on this forum) always appears on the editorial page here (much like Pogo used to)….
However… I must admit I enjoy seeing Funky in the comic section….its just when it approaches an area where it could benefit people reading it by taking a positive route, I think it falls flat when it takes the “artistic” negative route to kill off a character with a disease that everyone has “known” for decades to be a death warrant..and unfortunately that’s still the prevalent belief. Tom could not only inspire those with this dreaded to disease by allowing Lisa to live as well as educate the public that its NOT the death warrant diagnosis it once was.
I guess I don’t like to cringe when I open the comic section. I save my cringing for the front page of my newspaper….after that I need a relief..not more of the same.

I guess everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I have found as I have become a crotchety old fart that positive inspiration is a more powerful tool than hitting one over the head with negative reality. A positive outlook is SO important when treating this disease. If you can’t find positive in the comic section….you might as well read the front page and know that the world sucks.

Let Lisa Live!
Rich

#33 margaret
July/23/2007
@ 2:53 pm

I have been following lisa’s decision to enjoy what is left of her life and have a dignified death if no other treatment can cure. I have had breast cancer and am a survivor. But if no treatment was available to cure and only prolong death and not let me LIVE till i die, I would do as she is doing. I am a hospice nurse and know not every one can be cure. When talking with some one about deciding whether or not to go on hospice, I tell them “I can not add days to your life, but I can help add life to your days.” If they decide for hospice, that is not a death sentence. Some times when we get them comfortable they are able to make better decisions and may decide to go back for futher treatment. In that case we encourage them to revoke hospice and go for it. They can always come back if they decide to allow a natural dead with their family and friends supporting them.

#34 margaret
July/23/2007
@ 8:53 am

I have been following lisa’s decision to enjoy what is left of her life and have a dignified death if no other treatment can cure. I have had breast cancer and am a survivor. But if no treatment was available to cure and only prolong death and not let me LIVE till i die, I would do as she is doing. I am a hospice nurse and know not every one can be cure. When talking with some one about deciding whether or not to go on hospice, I tell them “I can not add days to your life, but I can help add life to your days.” If they decide for hospice, that is not a death sentence. Some times when we get them comfortable they are able to make better decisions and may decide to go back for futher treatment. In that case we encourage them to revoke hospice and go for it. They can always come back if they decide to allow a natural dead with their family and friends supporting them.

#35 Marsha McLaughln
July/24/2007
@ 2:36 am

Dear Sir,
My Name’s Marsha McLaughlin. I’m a Deaf to No Hear.
I’m Very Sorry! Poor Lisa Moore!
I’ll Miss Lisa Moore! I’m a sad to Poor Her Died.
Lisa’s Husband’s Daughter a Family of Old Memories Book
at Old Friends a old High School. & I Love Funky Winerbean to Comics at Lisa’s Story Book. Lisa Moore of Death. They’ll Miss Her Died. Lost Love. Jesus Christ’s Hand at Lisa Angel in Heaven to Families & Old Friends Angels Happy a Welcome Home at Lisa! Amen! I Love Lisa Moore! Lord Bless Lisa Moore!
Friend,
Marsha McLaughlin.

#36 Marsha McLaughln
July/23/2007
@ 8:36 pm

Dear Sir,
My Name’s Marsha McLaughlin. I’m a Deaf to No Hear.
I’m Very Sorry! Poor Lisa Moore!
I’ll Miss Lisa Moore! I’m a sad to Poor Her Died.
Lisa’s Husband’s Daughter a Family of Old Memories Book
at Old Friends a old High School. & I Love Funky Winerbean to Comics at Lisa’s Story Book. Lisa Moore of Death. They’ll Miss Her Died. Lost Love. Jesus Christ’s Hand at Lisa Angel in Heaven to Families & Old Friends Angels Happy a Welcome Home at Lisa! Amen! I Love Lisa Moore! Lord Bless Lisa Moore!
Friend,
Marsha McLaughlin.

#37 Robert Mora
August/6/2007
@ 8:03 pm

I love the stodyline as well. But I am also enjoying the adoption storyline. You see, my wife had a child many years ago, and gave her a chance at a better life, by giving her up for adoption. She always wanted to try and locate her daughter. Finally, after giving up actively looking for her, she fould her in the same University that she was attending, in the same degree program, in the ame internship cycle, and she was only 100 miles away all this time. Awesome!!!

#38 Robert Mora
August/6/2007
@ 2:03 pm

I love the stodyline as well. But I am also enjoying the adoption storyline. You see, my wife had a child many years ago, and gave her a chance at a better life, by giving her up for adoption. She always wanted to try and locate her daughter. Finally, after giving up actively looking for her, she fould her in the same University that she was attending, in the same degree program, in the ame internship cycle, and she was only 100 miles away all this time. Awesome!!!

#39 Jennifer Lowry
August/8/2007
@ 3:05 pm

I have to stop reading this comic. Every time I do, it depresses me. I’ll read it for a few days, I think about my own young daughter and the thought of leaving her without a mother, and voila! mood ruined. For some reason, maybe morbid curiosity, maybe to check if she’s been cured, I’ll check back on the comic a few days or a week or so later, and there she is, sicker than ever. I know all comics aren’t meant to be lighthearted, but that’s the only kind I think I care to read from here on out. I get enough reality in my own real life.

#40 Jennifer Lowry
August/8/2007
@ 9:05 am

I have to stop reading this comic. Every time I do, it depresses me. I’ll read it for a few days, I think about my own young daughter and the thought of leaving her without a mother, and voila! mood ruined. For some reason, maybe morbid curiosity, maybe to check if she’s been cured, I’ll check back on the comic a few days or a week or so later, and there she is, sicker than ever. I know all comics aren’t meant to be lighthearted, but that’s the only kind I think I care to read from here on out. I get enough reality in my own real life.

#41 Lisa McDonald
August/15/2007
@ 4:45 pm

I have been following this story closely and with interest. I have several family members who have died of similar causes. I would like to see Lisa enjoy all of her time that she has left, do what she can to help those who come after her, and face death with peace and dignity. This is life. Every single one of us will die of something, some much younger than others. This need not be sad, just the way life is. If Lisa knows her Creator is waiting to meet her on the other side, what a comfort in her present difficulty.

#42 Lisa McDonald
August/15/2007
@ 10:45 am

I have been following this story closely and with interest. I have several family members who have died of similar causes. I would like to see Lisa enjoy all of her time that she has left, do what she can to help those who come after her, and face death with peace and dignity. This is life. Every single one of us will die of something, some much younger than others. This need not be sad, just the way life is. If Lisa knows her Creator is waiting to meet her on the other side, what a comfort in her present difficulty.

#43 Rob Maisch
August/28/2007
@ 7:35 pm

Dear Tom,
Proceed as planned.
Don’t hold back the truth because people always seek happy endings. The plain sad truth is that cancer is insidious.
Cancer comes back.
Cancer kills the sweetest ones but does not discriminate as an equal opportunity destroyer of life.
I know.
10 months ago I walked out of the Cleveland Clinic a widower at 55 years of age.

My wife wasn’t saved by a last minute miracle. Neither are most people’s loved ones despite long and valliant battles in chemotherapy treatment rooms, radiation labs or sitting on the corners of their beds wracked with pain and nausea.

Just tell the truth in this story and know you are doing the right thing by all of us who have travelled down this road. We’ll be there with you every day for this important story just as we were there every day for those lost to us now. It may be painful, but I won’t miss a moment.

Godspeed,

-Rob-

#44 Rob Maisch
August/28/2007
@ 1:35 pm

Dear Tom,
Proceed as planned.
Don’t hold back the truth because people always seek happy endings. The plain sad truth is that cancer is insidious.
Cancer comes back.
Cancer kills the sweetest ones but does not discriminate as an equal opportunity destroyer of life.
I know.
10 months ago I walked out of the Cleveland Clinic a widower at 55 years of age.

My wife wasn’t saved by a last minute miracle. Neither are most people’s loved ones despite long and valliant battles in chemotherapy treatment rooms, radiation labs or sitting on the corners of their beds wracked with pain and nausea.

Just tell the truth in this story and know you are doing the right thing by all of us who have travelled down this road. We’ll be there with you every day for this important story just as we were there every day for those lost to us now. It may be painful, but I won’t miss a moment.

Godspeed,

-Rob-

#45 Sue P. Heiney, PhD, RN
September/11/2007
@ 5:53 pm

I believe that comic strips are another way to tell a story and discuss taboo topics such as death. Other comics notably Peanuts, have dealt with painful subjects in ways that help people express their feelings and learn they are not alone (similar to a support group). Also, it can bring up painful thoughts and feelings. Tom Batiuk is to be applauded for bringing back this character and making her so real that we feel she is part of our family and we mourn her future death.

#46 Sue P. Heiney, PhD, RN
September/11/2007
@ 11:53 am

I believe that comic strips are another way to tell a story and discuss taboo topics such as death. Other comics notably Peanuts, have dealt with painful subjects in ways that help people express their feelings and learn they are not alone (similar to a support group). Also, it can bring up painful thoughts and feelings. Tom Batiuk is to be applauded for bringing back this character and making her so real that we feel she is part of our family and we mourn her future death.

#47 Rich Diesslin
September/11/2007
@ 6:11 pm

Sue, sure cartoons can deal with those kinds subjects, but whether they should is entirely a matter of opinion. Personally I read the comics for entertainment; I don’t want to read a year long death by cancer cartoon, but that’s just my opinion. So I won’t, but hey, enjoy!

Death is a taboo subject? Unpopular in cartoons, yes, taboo … nah.

#48 Rich Diesslin
September/11/2007
@ 12:11 pm

Sue, sure cartoons can deal with those kinds subjects, but whether they should is entirely a matter of opinion. Personally I read the comics for entertainment; I don’t want to read a year long death by cancer cartoon, but that’s just my opinion. So I won’t, but hey, enjoy!

Death is a taboo subject? Unpopular in cartoons, yes, taboo … nah.

#49 C Nicholson
September/11/2007
@ 10:40 pm

I don’t ever cry when I read the comics – until now. Like with my mother who passed due to breast cancer, Lisa’s suffering has been long and palpital. How much more an artist can poor into his or her work I do not know or nor have ever seen. The rest of the words escape me…

#50 C Nicholson
September/11/2007
@ 4:40 pm

I don’t ever cry when I read the comics – until now. Like with my mother who passed due to breast cancer, Lisa’s suffering has been long and palpital. How much more an artist can poor into his or her work I do not know or nor have ever seen. The rest of the words escape me…

#51 Joanne Pisa
September/16/2007
@ 11:56 pm

I’m drawn to Lisa’s story and each day as I wait for the inevitable ending to come, I thank the Lord that when my mother had breast cancer back in the 1960s, when her radical mastectomy left us able to see her heart beat between her ribs, when the only chemotherapy was something called Mustrogen (mustard gas–like in WWI)through her IV every day for two weeks (I can still remember the horrible N&V) and her summer spent getting radiation therapy that burned her chest and damaged her heart–something that they protect patients from now), she never suffered a recurrence and we kept her until 1987. Life’s a coin toss for each of us and my prayers are for every one of Funky’s readers (and his creator) who are fighting this horrible disease, be it breast or any of the hundreds of versions of it.

#52 Joanne Pisa
September/16/2007
@ 5:56 pm

I’m drawn to Lisa’s story and each day as I wait for the inevitable ending to come, I thank the Lord that when my mother had breast cancer back in the 1960s, when her radical mastectomy left us able to see her heart beat between her ribs, when the only chemotherapy was something called Mustrogen (mustard gas–like in WWI)through her IV every day for two weeks (I can still remember the horrible N&V) and her summer spent getting radiation therapy that burned her chest and damaged her heart–something that they protect patients from now), she never suffered a recurrence and we kept her until 1987. Life’s a coin toss for each of us and my prayers are for every one of Funky’s readers (and his creator) who are fighting this horrible disease, be it breast or any of the hundreds of versions of it.

#53 Rick Davis
September/27/2007
@ 9:24 pm

I thank you, the story of Lisa is so true right down to the “Hospice”. Losing my dad to cancer this month, this strip has been helpful in coping with the loss and pain.
Thank you
Rick Davis

#54 Rick Davis
September/27/2007
@ 3:24 pm

I thank you, the story of Lisa is so true right down to the “Hospice”. Losing my dad to cancer this month, this strip has been helpful in coping with the loss and pain.
Thank you
Rick Davis

#55 Rich
October/2/2007
@ 2:25 pm

Hmmm, interesting debate. I can see both sides of the issue…but I still maintain that I read the comics as an ‘escape’ from the negative aspects of REAL life, not to see REAL LIFE and all its negatives reflected in them.
I see enough of that on TV

When was the last time you saw a couple of characters graphically having sex in the comics? I know…other issues involved…So I guess that not all REAL LIFE is desirable on the comics page even some of the funs stuff
…..and when a comic involves negative real life issues (disease,deaths, divorce, disasters, etc.) just to reflect “REAL LIFE”, I don’t think it makes it “Art” or “brave”, any more than a documentary, ’60 minutes’ or a non-fiction book is “art or brave”.

Each one may reflect life as the author experiences it……
speaking of which, since Tom had/has prostate cancer…why wasn’t one of the male characters given a terminal case of prostate cancer to reflect what Tom was/is going through. That would certainly be closer to the cartoonist expressing what he knows best.

And yes, we all live and we all die..nothing new there…but in between we try to enjoy ourselves and laugh and make as many memories as possible. I don’t need to turn to the comics to read about our inevitable deaths….I undersand that is going to happen… I have this weird expectation that the comics should be uplifting, not a death reminder. (note the word “comic” as we use for one who tells ‘stand-up comedy’……can you imagine someone getting up on stage and discussing the slow painful death of someone with cancer….is that the forum just because it reflects real life?

But if I REALLY have this craving to be reminded about how Sh%%ty our lives on this planet can be or are at any given moment, all I need to do is turn to the Op/Ed page.

Rich

#56 Rich
October/2/2007
@ 8:25 am

Hmmm, interesting debate. I can see both sides of the issue…but I still maintain that I read the comics as an ‘escape’ from the negative aspects of REAL life, not to see REAL LIFE and all its negatives reflected in them.
I see enough of that on TV

When was the last time you saw a couple of characters graphically having sex in the comics? I know…other issues involved…So I guess that not all REAL LIFE is desirable on the comics page even some of the funs stuff
…..and when a comic involves negative real life issues (disease,deaths, divorce, disasters, etc.) just to reflect “REAL LIFE”, I don’t think it makes it “Art” or “brave”, any more than a documentary, ’60 minutes’ or a non-fiction book is “art or brave”.

Each one may reflect life as the author experiences it……
speaking of which, since Tom had/has prostate cancer…why wasn’t one of the male characters given a terminal case of prostate cancer to reflect what Tom was/is going through. That would certainly be closer to the cartoonist expressing what he knows best.

And yes, we all live and we all die..nothing new there…but in between we try to enjoy ourselves and laugh and make as many memories as possible. I don’t need to turn to the comics to read about our inevitable deaths….I undersand that is going to happen… I have this weird expectation that the comics should be uplifting, not a death reminder. (note the word “comic” as we use for one who tells ‘stand-up comedy’……can you imagine someone getting up on stage and discussing the slow painful death of someone with cancer….is that the forum just because it reflects real life?

But if I REALLY have this craving to be reminded about how Sh%%ty our lives on this planet can be or are at any given moment, all I need to do is turn to the Op/Ed page.

Rich

#57 Robert Ring
October/2/2007
@ 5:06 pm

My wife passed away from braet cancer 8 years ago. It’s amazing how dead on you are with the different things that happen in those private moments between a husband and his wife with cancer.

Reading the funnies hurts but I read it anyway. I can’t say for sure why but something compels me.

You have done a wonderful job of portraying that husband wife relationship.

#58 Robert Ring
October/2/2007
@ 11:06 am

My wife passed away from braet cancer 8 years ago. It’s amazing how dead on you are with the different things that happen in those private moments between a husband and his wife with cancer.

Reading the funnies hurts but I read it anyway. I can’t say for sure why but something compels me.

You have done a wonderful job of portraying that husband wife relationship.

#59 juliana sadock savino
October/3/2007
@ 8:57 pm

Dea Tom,

I lost my mother and my “baby” sister to cancer withing the past 3 years. My sister had survived breast cancer for 5 years, when a visual disturbance led to the disconver of a brain metastatis. I am amazed at how much your drawings, in particular, refelect the reality of cancer, without being exploitative. Somehow I am actually comforted by seeing my family’s story told through you. I look forward to the KSU Press publication of this series. Be well, stay well, and thank you.

#60 juliana sadock savino
October/3/2007
@ 2:57 pm

Dea Tom,

I lost my mother and my “baby” sister to cancer withing the past 3 years. My sister had survived breast cancer for 5 years, when a visual disturbance led to the disconver of a brain metastatis. I am amazed at how much your drawings, in particular, refelect the reality of cancer, without being exploitative. Somehow I am actually comforted by seeing my family’s story told through you. I look forward to the KSU Press publication of this series. Be well, stay well, and thank you.

#61 Don Gantt
October/4/2007
@ 12:17 pm

Incredible. A tiny, 3-panel graphic carrying the power to flawlessly portray (for the uninitiated) as well as remind (for the experienced) the unparalleled depth of emotion that the touch of cancer elicits. You have educated thousands, many of whom will in the future be able draw strength from these invaluable lessons (though perhaps forgetting the source) learned from ’99 to 10/4/07, in order to survive their own ordeal. I’ve been there….this is a gift. Congratulations Tom.

#62 Don Gantt
October/4/2007
@ 6:17 am

Incredible. A tiny, 3-panel graphic carrying the power to flawlessly portray (for the uninitiated) as well as remind (for the experienced) the unparalleled depth of emotion that the touch of cancer elicits. You have educated thousands, many of whom will in the future be able draw strength from these invaluable lessons (though perhaps forgetting the source) learned from ’99 to 10/4/07, in order to survive their own ordeal. I’ve been there….this is a gift. Congratulations Tom.

#63 Eric Burke
October/4/2007
@ 1:26 pm

I would like to see Mr. Batiuk work the reality of prostate cancer into Funky Winkerbean. Highlight the importance of early detection and prevention for guys, whom tend to be stubborn when it comes to seeing doctors. He has the storytelling abilities, and I hope he continues to use them for more than just gag-a-day fare. The paper has enough of those as is…

#64 Eric Burke
October/4/2007
@ 7:26 am

I would like to see Mr. Batiuk work the reality of prostate cancer into Funky Winkerbean. Highlight the importance of early detection and prevention for guys, whom tend to be stubborn when it comes to seeing doctors. He has the storytelling abilities, and I hope he continues to use them for more than just gag-a-day fare. The paper has enough of those as is…

#65 cyndy stubenvoll
October/4/2007
@ 3:19 pm

Wow! You let Lisa die. I didn’t realize she was going to die of breast cancer until few days ago or last week. And I was saddened by that realization. And I cried. It is a cartoon after all… full of fun and laughter. But life goes on even in cartoons. They show us that life is what we make of it.

A dear friend of mine was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2003. She was a strong soldier and fought the battle every step of the way. She stayed on course, helped us give our own soldiers coming home from Iraq a grand homecoming. I watched her watching us. We had our soldiers and she did too. But her job was done… she guided us to realize the story doesn’t end with her death or someone else’s or when they come home. We need to carry on.

Soon my soldier son is going back to Iraq. And she will be there in our hearts and spirit so we can let them go and fight the battles that need to be done… I fear for my soldier and the rest of the armied forces but the line has been drawn in the sand and the enemy has stepped over it. Just as Lisa Moore drew her own line to fight the battle, we will remember her strength (and her husband’s) in days. Praying for all who fight the battle against all types of cancer. God’s peace.

#66 cyndy stubenvoll
October/4/2007
@ 9:19 am

Wow! You let Lisa die. I didn’t realize she was going to die of breast cancer until few days ago or last week. And I was saddened by that realization. And I cried. It is a cartoon after all… full of fun and laughter. But life goes on even in cartoons. They show us that life is what we make of it.

A dear friend of mine was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2003. She was a strong soldier and fought the battle every step of the way. She stayed on course, helped us give our own soldiers coming home from Iraq a grand homecoming. I watched her watching us. We had our soldiers and she did too. But her job was done… she guided us to realize the story doesn’t end with her death or someone else’s or when they come home. We need to carry on.

Soon my soldier son is going back to Iraq. And she will be there in our hearts and spirit so we can let them go and fight the battles that need to be done… I fear for my soldier and the rest of the armied forces but the line has been drawn in the sand and the enemy has stepped over it. Just as Lisa Moore drew her own line to fight the battle, we will remember her strength (and her husband’s) in days. Praying for all who fight the battle against all types of cancer. God’s peace.

#67 Sarah Whalen
October/4/2007
@ 3:35 pm

Dear Mr. Batiuk,

I am deeply saddened to read of Lisa’s death from breast cancer. Lisa was a warm and wonderful person; in many ways, we grew up together, and I will miss her very much.

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer several years ago, Lisa became not my hope or my inspiration, but my real companion in a difficult, challenging journey. It is hard to explain how close we became, without ever meeting. I never thought I was her, and I am sure she never thought she was me, although we both have small children. My son was six when I was diagnosed. The choices Lisa made always profoundly interested me, as all cancer patients have to make some pretty deep decisions. Actually, all people make these same decisions, sooner or later. But people who take their cancer seriously know they can’t postpone things.

Although Lisa has died, I am not without hope–not at all. But the cancer–and Lisa’s death from it–makes me more aware that my time on earth is finite. I would rather live one day that counts, than ten that don’t. I knew Lisa well enough to see that she felt that way.

I loved Lisa for who she was. I want to glimpse the future she couldn’t see. I would like to see how Summer grows up. I hope you will keep writing and let us know. Not the end, there is no end. There is just a future we will never see ourselves.

Lisa’s death doesn’t take away my hope of surviving cancer. Lisa’s death, so beautifully illustrated by you, just makes me realize how much I love her.

Being a writer, I know that you must have suffered over Lisa’s condition, and losing her is a cruel blow to you especially. I know this has not been a heartless move on your part. Lisa’s story is, in fact, proof of how much you do love your readers, and of how honest and brave you are willing to be for them.

Please accept my deep and profound sympathies.

Sincerely,

Sarah

#68 Sarah Whalen
October/4/2007
@ 9:35 am

Dear Mr. Batiuk,

I am deeply saddened to read of Lisa’s death from breast cancer. Lisa was a warm and wonderful person; in many ways, we grew up together, and I will miss her very much.

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer several years ago, Lisa became not my hope or my inspiration, but my real companion in a difficult, challenging journey. It is hard to explain how close we became, without ever meeting. I never thought I was her, and I am sure she never thought she was me, although we both have small children. My son was six when I was diagnosed. The choices Lisa made always profoundly interested me, as all cancer patients have to make some pretty deep decisions. Actually, all people make these same decisions, sooner or later. But people who take their cancer seriously know they can’t postpone things.

Although Lisa has died, I am not without hope–not at all. But the cancer–and Lisa’s death from it–makes me more aware that my time on earth is finite. I would rather live one day that counts, than ten that don’t. I knew Lisa well enough to see that she felt that way.

I loved Lisa for who she was. I want to glimpse the future she couldn’t see. I would like to see how Summer grows up. I hope you will keep writing and let us know. Not the end, there is no end. There is just a future we will never see ourselves.

Lisa’s death doesn’t take away my hope of surviving cancer. Lisa’s death, so beautifully illustrated by you, just makes me realize how much I love her.

Being a writer, I know that you must have suffered over Lisa’s condition, and losing her is a cruel blow to you especially. I know this has not been a heartless move on your part. Lisa’s story is, in fact, proof of how much you do love your readers, and of how honest and brave you are willing to be for them.

Please accept my deep and profound sympathies.

Sincerely,

Sarah

#69 Lynda Jo Wilson
October/5/2007
@ 12:12 am

I and several of my co-workers were deeply moved by lisa’s death. We had followed the storyline and prayed for a cure for months. She would be surely missed. We will keep Funky and Lil Summer in our hearts.

#70 Lynda Jo Wilson
October/4/2007
@ 6:12 pm

I and several of my co-workers were deeply moved by lisa’s death. We had followed the storyline and prayed for a cure for months. She would be surely missed. We will keep Funky and Lil Summer in our hearts.

#71 Alan LaGrone
October/5/2007
@ 3:34 am

Tom,

I have found myself profoundly moved by Lisa’s story. Your sensitivity and caring for her speaks very highly of you. However I also find myself equally moved by Lisa’s incredible grace as she strugles with her impending death. Her final words were ones of hope. I know in my heart of hearts that Lisa and Les will meet again. The two of you have set a standard that we should all live by.

Thank you.

Alan

#72 Alan LaGrone
October/4/2007
@ 9:34 pm

Tom,

I have found myself profoundly moved by Lisa’s story. Your sensitivity and caring for her speaks very highly of you. However I also find myself equally moved by Lisa’s incredible grace as she strugles with her impending death. Her final words were ones of hope. I know in my heart of hearts that Lisa and Les will meet again. The two of you have set a standard that we should all live by.

Thank you.

Alan

#73 David Brown
October/5/2007
@ 7:38 am

I’m a 71 year old grandfather of 4, Reading these comments with tears in my eyes about the death of a comic strip character. One I have watched for many years as I watched my 2 daughters grow up along with all of the “funky gang”. As a family we have lost some of our own to cancer as well as friends, neighbors and co-workers.
How appropriate that Lisa leaves us during this month, October, Breast Cancer Awareness month. There is so much more to be done before we can beat this disease. Your creative talent and experence together has opened a new avenue to inform and educate the public. I second everything Alan, the previous comment, has said. Thank you so very much.
David Brown Alvin, Texas

#74 David Brown
October/5/2007
@ 1:38 pm

I’m a 71 year old grandfather of 4, Reading these comments with tears in my eyes about the death of a comic strip character. One I have watched for many years as I watched my 2 daughters grow up along with all of the “funky gang”. As a family we have lost some of our own to cancer as well as friends, neighbors and co-workers.
How appropriate that Lisa leaves us during this month, October, Breast Cancer Awareness month. There is so much more to be done before we can beat this disease. Your creative talent and experence together has opened a new avenue to inform and educate the public. I second everything Alan, the previous comment, has said. Thank you so very much.
David Brown Alvin, Texas

#75 Mary Frances Strebel
October/5/2007
@ 2:47 pm

Dear Tom,

Today a friend shared her thoughts with me about your column. Unfortunately, I had skipped it over the years as a comic reader just looking for my daily “chuckle.” However, now I believe that I have been missing something that is just as important in our daily walk, lessons we can learn from the experience of an insightful writer sharing his journey that many of us have been on with a loved one. In the past four years I have lost a dear friend to colon cancer, another to lung cancer and presently, a dear friend is battling ovarian cancer. Understanding the journey of the spouses is not always clear to friends, depending on the level of openness and vulnerability of the cancer patient and their mate to other loved ones. Your story can help so many loosen the bonds of that vulnerability early on. We are all in this together and we all have the best gift of all to share with one another, love’n hugs.
Bless you on your journey, Tom.

#76 Mary Frances Strebel
October/5/2007
@ 8:47 am

Dear Tom,

Today a friend shared her thoughts with me about your column. Unfortunately, I had skipped it over the years as a comic reader just looking for my daily “chuckle.” However, now I believe that I have been missing something that is just as important in our daily walk, lessons we can learn from the experience of an insightful writer sharing his journey that many of us have been on with a loved one. In the past four years I have lost a dear friend to colon cancer, another to lung cancer and presently, a dear friend is battling ovarian cancer. Understanding the journey of the spouses is not always clear to friends, depending on the level of openness and vulnerability of the cancer patient and their mate to other loved ones. Your story can help so many loosen the bonds of that vulnerability early on. We are all in this together and we all have the best gift of all to share with one another, love’n hugs.
Bless you on your journey, Tom.

#77 Dee Lambert
October/5/2007
@ 5:00 pm

Dear Tom,
I too have been following this storyline and wondering if there was a personal story in your own life that inspired Lisa’s story.
Yesterday, when I read the paper, I sat at my kitche table and cried. I feel as if I have gotten to know these characters and felt their pain. I especially loved the end, where she says, “I love you”.
We lost our daughter at age 32, suddenly, (congestive heart failure) something we were all totally unaware of, so there were no good-byes, no last words to say to each other.
Your story made me wonder if, as she was dying, she thought of us as well, all of us who loved her.
We have lost good friends and family to cancer and the reality of your comic strip really hit home. You forced us all to imagine the unimaginable, with grace and love. Thank you.

#78 Dee Lambert
October/5/2007
@ 11:00 am

Dear Tom,
I too have been following this storyline and wondering if there was a personal story in your own life that inspired Lisa’s story.
Yesterday, when I read the paper, I sat at my kitche table and cried. I feel as if I have gotten to know these characters and felt their pain. I especially loved the end, where she says, “I love you”.
We lost our daughter at age 32, suddenly, (congestive heart failure) something we were all totally unaware of, so there were no good-byes, no last words to say to each other.
Your story made me wonder if, as she was dying, she thought of us as well, all of us who loved her.
We have lost good friends and family to cancer and the reality of your comic strip really hit home. You forced us all to imagine the unimaginable, with grace and love. Thank you.

#79 Jeff Hewitt
October/6/2007
@ 3:48 am

Tom–

I’ve been a long-time fan of Funky and (like many others) thought that you were getting into too many “serious” (unfunny) subjects in the strip.

Hey, the comics are for entertainment, right? But “Lisa’s Story” has changed that perception. I lost my brother to cancer recently and appreciate your sensitive and realistic handling of this story. I don’t recall crying when reading a comic strip before…

But I do hope you lighten the strip up now. It’s time for some of your inimitable wit!

Thanks for telling this story so well.

#80 Jeff Hewitt
October/5/2007
@ 9:48 pm

Tom–

I’ve been a long-time fan of Funky and (like many others) thought that you were getting into too many “serious” (unfunny) subjects in the strip.

Hey, the comics are for entertainment, right? But “Lisa’s Story” has changed that perception. I lost my brother to cancer recently and appreciate your sensitive and realistic handling of this story. I don’t recall crying when reading a comic strip before…

But I do hope you lighten the strip up now. It’s time for some of your inimitable wit!

Thanks for telling this story so well.

#81 Margaret
October/6/2007
@ 4:57 pm

Dear Tom,
My Father died in July of bone cancer. He was on Hospice care, and took his last breath in my arms. Every day I open the paper, read the strip and cry. What you say with a few pictures and words touches my heart beyond belief. When I read it, I don’t feel so alone. I feel someone understands what it means to die of cancer.

I cut out and saved the strip where he asks the Hospice nurse what is “the last thing to go?” and she says, “Love.”
Thank You.
Margaret

#82 Margaret
October/6/2007
@ 10:57 am

Dear Tom,
My Father died in July of bone cancer. He was on Hospice care, and took his last breath in my arms. Every day I open the paper, read the strip and cry. What you say with a few pictures and words touches my heart beyond belief. When I read it, I don’t feel so alone. I feel someone understands what it means to die of cancer.

I cut out and saved the strip where he asks the Hospice nurse what is “the last thing to go?” and she says, “Love.”
Thank You.
Margaret

#83 Roger Brownell
October/7/2007
@ 4:23 am

Tom-
Fifty years of reading the comics and never has one affected me as your series about Lisa. Close to home? No. In my home. My beautiful wife died of cancer this year. To see it in a comic strip triggers many feelings. She is now at the Lord’s feet. May God Bless her.

#84 Roger Brownell
October/6/2007
@ 10:23 pm

Tom-
Fifty years of reading the comics and never has one affected me as your series about Lisa. Close to home? No. In my home. My beautiful wife died of cancer this year. To see it in a comic strip triggers many feelings. She is now at the Lord’s feet. May God Bless her.

#85 Dawn Douglass
October/7/2007
@ 5:48 am

Amen, Roger. I lost my husband of 25 years to cancer last summer. He was just 46. Being without him is something I never expected, and I’m sure I’ll never stop missing him. Cancer sucks. But just remember that it doesn’t have the final say…we’ll all be together again someday.

Have you read “90 minutes in Heaven” by Don Piper? It may make you feel better. God bless.

#86 Dawn Douglass
October/6/2007
@ 11:48 pm

Amen, Roger. I lost my husband of 25 years to cancer last summer. He was just 46. Being without him is something I never expected, and I’m sure I’ll never stop missing him. Cancer sucks. But just remember that it doesn’t have the final say…we’ll all be together again someday.

Have you read “90 minutes in Heaven” by Don Piper? It may make you feel better. God bless.

#87 Dave
October/11/2007
@ 4:19 am

To FW’s creator:

I was fine with your strip staying on the comics page. Fine. Mary Worth and Family Circus were never a comic for me in the definition of the word: funny. Neither was yours, but maybe there are others out there that read it for the comedy which I cannot find. Each to his own.

But when you take it down from funny to truly depressing, you should be ripped off the page, immediately. 25 years of comic reading, that I can remember, and not once did I ever think FW was worth reading for its purpose. Now, it’s worth less. This is the comics page – people do not come here to be reminded of their own tragedy and pain. It is not the venue you are using it to be. Real life and modern society can remind us more than we could ever want of what can cause us physical and emotional pain. You are using the equivalent of using Looney Tunes as a forum to discuss abortions. Those two should never mix, no matter how much you think it may be.

Before you open your mouth, I watched my father-in-law wither away from lung cancer and I fear everyday that my wife will come to the same fate. This is not ignorance is bliss; I am fully aware of cancer and its effects on the victims and their loved ones.

I don’t need to be reminded of it while I’m trying to read the new Dilbert or Get Fuzzy. This whole scenario, as is all of your other ‘groundbreaking’ storylines, reek of shock value for more readers. Attention keeps you in business when your strip has no other redeeming qualities. 35 years has run you pretty thin, it seems. You are lowering yourself to the level of a high and mighty Howard Stern, for that reason, maybe you should pack up shop while you’re ahead.

Sadly, Bill Amend closed up the dailies business and gave room to a new strip in news papers across the country. Don’t you think it’s time you do the same? Whatever story you still have to tell, save it. I am sure you are devising some new hot button issue to exploit for readership. Do me a favor, before Funkito Winkerbeano the illegal immigrant joins the band, retire. Quickly.

#88 Dave
October/10/2007
@ 10:19 pm

To FW’s creator:

I was fine with your strip staying on the comics page. Fine. Mary Worth and Family Circus were never a comic for me in the definition of the word: funny. Neither was yours, but maybe there are others out there that read it for the comedy which I cannot find. Each to his own.

But when you take it down from funny to truly depressing, you should be ripped off the page, immediately. 25 years of comic reading, that I can remember, and not once did I ever think FW was worth reading for its purpose. Now, it’s worth less. This is the comics page – people do not come here to be reminded of their own tragedy and pain. It is not the venue you are using it to be. Real life and modern society can remind us more than we could ever want of what can cause us physical and emotional pain. You are using the equivalent of using Looney Tunes as a forum to discuss abortions. Those two should never mix, no matter how much you think it may be.

Before you open your mouth, I watched my father-in-law wither away from lung cancer and I fear everyday that my wife will come to the same fate. This is not ignorance is bliss; I am fully aware of cancer and its effects on the victims and their loved ones.

I don’t need to be reminded of it while I’m trying to read the new Dilbert or Get Fuzzy. This whole scenario, as is all of your other ‘groundbreaking’ storylines, reek of shock value for more readers. Attention keeps you in business when your strip has no other redeeming qualities. 35 years has run you pretty thin, it seems. You are lowering yourself to the level of a high and mighty Howard Stern, for that reason, maybe you should pack up shop while you’re ahead.

Sadly, Bill Amend closed up the dailies business and gave room to a new strip in news papers across the country. Don’t you think it’s time you do the same? Whatever story you still have to tell, save it. I am sure you are devising some new hot button issue to exploit for readership. Do me a favor, before Funkito Winkerbeano the illegal immigrant joins the band, retire. Quickly.

#89 Eric Burke
October/11/2007
@ 1:07 pm

Howard Stern is better than ever on Sirius! Worth every penny of the $12.95 a month I pay…plus, they replay the show all day on Howard 100 and then Howard 101. And let’s not forget the wrap up show!

If Tom Batiuk is really “lowering” his game to Stern’s level, we’re in for some great toons!

#90 Eric Burke
October/11/2007
@ 7:07 am

Howard Stern is better than ever on Sirius! Worth every penny of the $12.95 a month I pay…plus, they replay the show all day on Howard 100 and then Howard 101. And let’s not forget the wrap up show!

If Tom Batiuk is really “lowering” his game to Stern’s level, we’re in for some great toons!

#91 nestor
October/16/2007
@ 5:22 pm

greetings from miami.i have no idea if funky was ever published by the herald,i was into the news way back then.but i have and idea that might increase circulation in any paper its published in.why not create a comic strip lampooning fidel castro of cuba,hugo chavez of venezuela and evo morales of bolivia.im 100% sure that it will spread like fire when your latino readers get the first glimpse.and its not like you are offending allah or mohamed(im catholic),instead
you will bring laughterto those who read it and ridicule to that trio of country destructors.if you dont like the idea maybe your political cartoonist coleagues would take a shot at it.i am already laughing without having seen the first print.stay healthy keep up the good work…tenga usted un bonito dia…nestor

#92 nestor
October/16/2007
@ 11:22 am

greetings from miami.i have no idea if funky was ever published by the herald,i was into the news way back then.but i have and idea that might increase circulation in any paper its published in.why not create a comic strip lampooning fidel castro of cuba,hugo chavez of venezuela and evo morales of bolivia.im 100% sure that it will spread like fire when your latino readers get the first glimpse.and its not like you are offending allah or mohamed(im catholic),instead
you will bring laughterto those who read it and ridicule to that trio of country destructors.if you dont like the idea maybe your political cartoonist coleagues would take a shot at it.i am already laughing without having seen the first print.stay healthy keep up the good work…tenga usted un bonito dia…nestor

#93 Louis Heacock
October/17/2007
@ 8:07 pm

For Tom Batiuk

I appreciated your story of Lisa’s bout with cancer.

#94 Louis Heacock
October/17/2007
@ 2:07 pm

For Tom Batiuk

I appreciated your story of Lisa’s bout with cancer.

#95 cyndy stubenvoll
February/23/2008
@ 11:31 pm

I don’t know if anyone comes here anymore to read the words of wisdom but I had to come back and leave another message of words.

A few weeks ago my sister received the news that the lump the doctor removed was indeed cancer. Sigh… we all cried for her, with her as she was once again under the knife. At the young age of 19 years she was diagnosed with Hodgkins. She won that battle. She thought the fight was gone as she was going to celebrate her 25th year of remission with all her different groups of friends.

When she was first told that she had cancer again she was only going to have one breast removed. The next day after hours of thinking and reviewing the options she firmly decided to have both removed. Wow! What a soldier she is. (She was in the Air Force during the first Gulf War.) I have talked to her and she is doing great. She is one who never hides the results. I may be 10 yrs older but she is my hero. Her friends have rallied around her. Giving her the best support system I have ever seen. So… Lisa died but she gave a foundation to build on. As Tiny Tim said… God bless us all everyone!!

#96 cyndy stubenvoll
February/23/2008
@ 4:31 pm

I don’t know if anyone comes here anymore to read the words of wisdom but I had to come back and leave another message of words.

A few weeks ago my sister received the news that the lump the doctor removed was indeed cancer. Sigh… we all cried for her, with her as she was once again under the knife. At the young age of 19 years she was diagnosed with Hodgkins. She won that battle. She thought the fight was gone as she was going to celebrate her 25th year of remission with all her different groups of friends.

When she was first told that she had cancer again she was only going to have one breast removed. The next day after hours of thinking and reviewing the options she firmly decided to have both removed. Wow! What a soldier she is. (She was in the Air Force during the first Gulf War.) I have talked to her and she is doing great. She is one who never hides the results. I may be 10 yrs older but she is my hero. Her friends have rallied around her. Giving her the best support system I have ever seen. So… Lisa died but she gave a foundation to build on. As Tiny Tim said… God bless us all everyone!!

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